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plumbing03.htm Plumbing

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PREPARING PIPING MATERIALS

Preparing piping material for installation requires that the pipe be measured, marked, cut, and cleaned. The last learning event described how to measure pipes used in a waste system. This learning event describes how to mark, cut, and clean piping material.

Preparing Cast-Iron Soil Pipe

Marking. When you cut with a hammer and chisel, mark completely around the pipe where it is to be cut. When you cut with a soil pipe cutter, one mark on the pipe is adequate. Use a crayon or chalk to mark piping material.

Marking A Cast-Iron Soil Pipe

 

Cutting with a soil pipe cutter. This method can be used to cut uninstalled pipes. It can also be used to cut pipes that are already installed but need to be repaired. Use the following steps:

  1. If the pipe is not installed, set it in a vise.
  2. Place the cutting wheels of the cutter on the measured mark. Tighten the adjusting knob.
  3. Rotate the cutter back and forth around the pipe.
  4. Continue tightening the adjusting knob and rotating the cutter until the pipe is cut.

Cutting with a soil pipe cutter.

 

Cutting with a hammer and cold chisel. This method can be used to cut cast-iron soil pipe when a cutter is unavailable. Use the following steps:

  1. Lay the pipe on a wooden board or a mound of dirt.
  2. Place the chisel on the measured mark. Tap it lightly with the hammer, scoring completely around the pipe.
  3. Using firmer blows, score around the pipe again.
  4. Continue scoring until the pipe breaks off.

Cutting with a hammer and cold chisel.

 

Cleaning. Remove foreign matter or moisture on the pipe ends with a rag.

Preparing Rigid Plastic Pipe (ABS and PVC)

Marking. Mark the pipe with a crayon or chalk at the required length.

Cutting with a hacksaw. Use the following steps:

  1. Place uninstalled marked pipe in a miter box or a vise. If a vise is used, cover the jaws with a rag to prevent damage to the pipe.
  2. Make the cut on the measured mark with a fine-tooth hacksaw. Be certain that the pipe is cut squarely, or it will not join properly.

Cutting with a hacksaw.

 

Removing burrs. Remove the burrs on the pipe's cut end with a pocket knife or sandpaper. When removing the burrs, be careful not to damage the pipe ends.

Removing burrs.

 

Removing gloss and cleaning. For a good joint connection, use sandpaper to remove the gloss from the outside ends of the pipe. Then clean the pipe with an authorized solvent cleaner.

Removing gloss and cleaning.

 

Preparing Galvanized Steel Pipe

Marking. Mark the pipe with a crayon or chalk at the required length.

Cutting with a pipe cutter. Use the following steps:

  1. Place the pipe in a vise with the measured mark about 8 inches from the vise.
  2. Set the cutting wheel on the mark and turn the cutter handle clockwise to get a bite on the pipe.
  3. Turn the whole cutter clockwise, applying cutting oil to the cutting wheel.
  4. After each complete turn of the cutter, give the handle a quarter turn until the pipe is cut.

Cutting with a pipe cutter.

 

Cutting with a hacksaw. Use the following steps:

  1. Place the pipe in a vise.
  2. With a fine-tooth hacksaw, cut the pipe on the measured mark.
  3. Make the cut as squarely as possible to simplify threading the pipe when joining.

Cutting with a hacksaw.

 

Removing burrs. Remove burrs on the outside of the pipe's cut end with a fine metal file. Remove burrs on the inside with a pipe reamer. With the pipe reamer use the following steps:

  1. Push the reamer into the pipe, applying pressure with one hand.
  2. With the other hand, turn the reamer clockwise using short, even strokes until all burrs are removed.

Removing burrs.

 

Threading. Use a die and die stock to thread the ends of the pipe. Use the following steps:

  1. Insert the correct size die in the die stock.
  2. Slide the die stock over the pipe end and apply pressure to the stock with one hand.
  3. With the other hand, turn the stock handle clockwise slowly until the die has taken a bite on the pipe.
  4. Give the stock handle one complete clockwise turn and then back off a quarter turn, applying cutting oil as needed.
  5. Repeat this action until inch of the pipe is beyond the die stock.
  6. Remove the die stock by turning the handle in a counterclockwise direction.

Threading.

 

Cleaning. Prepare the threaded end for a joint connection by removing excess oil with a heavy rag and any chips with a wire brush.

Preparing Rigid Copper Tubing (DWV)

Marking. Mark the pipe with a crayon or chalk at the required length.

Cutting with a tube cutter. Use the following steps:

  1. Hold the tubing with one hand, and set the cutting wheel on the measured mark with the other hand.
  2. Turn the knob on the cutter until the wheel takes a bite on the tubing.
  3. Turn the cutter in a clockwise direction, and, at the same time, turn the knob.
  4. Continue this action until the tubing is cut.

Cutting with a tube cutter.

 

Cutting with a hacksaw. Use the following steps:

  1. Place the tubing in a miter box or vise.
  2. Using a fine-tooth hacksaw, cut the tubing.
  3. Make the cut as squarely as possible for a good joint connection.

Cutting with a hacksaw.

 

Removing burrs. You can move burrs from inside the tubing by going around the cut end lightly with a fine-metal file. You can also remove burr with a tube cutter reamer blade. Use the following steps:

  1. Place the reamer blade into the tubing end.
  2. Turn the handle clockwise until all the burrs are removed.

Removing burrs.

 

Cleaning. For a good joint connection, use emery cloth to clean the outside end of the tubing and the inside of the fitting. Clean to a bright shine.

Cleaning.


David L. Heiserman, Editor

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All Rights Reserved

Revised: June 06, 2015