Case 7

Chapter 7

Civil Disturbance Operations in Confinement Facilities

Civil disturbance doctrine is usually written for quelling disturbances that occur in large open areas where the size of the responding force or the type of formation employed is not hampered by a lack of space. However, in the military confinement environment, inmate disturbances often occur in small, closed areas, such as an inmate's housing unit, a gymnasium, a dining facility, or a chapel where maneuver space and equipment limit the size of the element that may be employed. The layout of each facility is different and presents its own unique problems when employing forces. This chapter covers the use of small military police teams, forced cell move teams (FCMTs), and the formations used to move an unruly inmate from one cell to another. Small generic riot control formations are discussed to provide the commander with a basic employment option that he can tailor to his facility to enable him to regain control of the affected area. The use of NL munitions and RCAs are incorporated into this discussion.

Crowd Dynamics Within the Confinement Facility

7-1. In confinement facility disturbances, inmates employ a number of tactics to resist control or to achieve their goals. Tactics may be unplanned or planned and nonviolent or violent. When a disturbance carries many purposes, it is likely that their tactics are well planned.

Nonviolent Tactics

7-2. Nonviolent tactics range from name-calling to building barricades. Inmates may attempt to distract control force members by shouting at or ridiculing them or by using abusive language, obscene remarks, taunts, and jeers. The inmates' goals are to anger and demoralize the control force. They also want authorities to take actions that may later be exploited as acts of brutality.

Violent Tactics

7-3. Violent crowd tactics used by inmates are often extremely destructive and can include physical attacks on cadre, other inmates, and property. Use of violent tactics is limited only by the attitudes and ingenuity of the inmates, the training of their leaders, and the materials available to them. Inmates often commit violence with crude homemade weapons. If unplanned violence occurs, inmates will use mops, brooms, chairs, beds, or whatever else is on hand as weapons of violence. During planned violent disturbances, inmates can easily conceal makeshift weapons or tools to use against the control force. Inmates often erect barricades to impede troop movement and/or to prevent the control force from entering certain areas or buildings. Inmates can be expected to vent their emotions on individuals (cadre or inmates), the control force, their equipment, and/or the institution's property. Inmates direct dangerous objects like carts, barrels, liquids, and burning shoe polish at the control force.

Grievance Protest

7-4. A grievance protest may be organized as a riot. However, under normal circumstances, a riot of this type is not of an extremely violent nature. It may turn violent when leaders attempt to exploit any successes or weaknesses found in the control force.

Unorganized Riots

7-5. Unorganized riots are characterized as being spontaneous in nature. However, they could be exploited and diverted by leaders at any subsequent stage of the riot, turning it into a different type. They may begin as an isolated assault against authority figures, or acts of civil disobedience. Under determined leadership, an unorganized riot could change to an organized riot.

Multiple Riots

7-6. Multiple riots may happen when a disturbance occurs in one area of the confinement facility, causing others to riot in their areas. To control this situation with only one riot control force available, the force commander should first subdue the most violent riot. At the same time, he should employ some of his control forces to contain the other riots until the main control force is able to move to those locations to subdue them.

Cadre Behavior

7-7. The cadre is susceptible to crowd behavior. They become emotionally stimulated during tense confrontation with unruly and violent inmates. Commanders must be aware of the mood and attitude of the crowd and its effect on the control force cadre. To counteract the effects of crowd behavior on the cadre, the commanders must institute rigorous training and firm and effective leadership. This training must include a complete awareness and understanding of the use of force and the commander's intent. These are all necessary to offset the effect of crowd contagion upon the control force. Even with the best training and leadership, control force members must exercise individual and collective restraint.

planning

7-8. Preplanning is the preparation and training conducted before a crisis occurs. The purpose of preplanning is to have plans and standing operating procedures (SOPs) in place so the cadre may react to an emergency and successfully contain and neutralize the situation. The preplanning process includes plan development, intelligence gathering, and training.

NOTE: Intelligence gathering is essential for the successful containment, neutralization, and/or prevention of a riot.

7-9. Once the control force team has been alerted to a disturbance within the confinement facility, leaders further develop preplans to fit the situation much the same way that DOD develops war plans.

7-10. During the planning process, leaders must be aware of the potential risks involved in quelling disturbances within a confinement facility. Careful planning minimizes collateral damage and risks to control force members and hostages.

7-11. The use of NLW and NL munitions must also be considered when developing plans. There must be strict accountability and control of RCAs, their employment, and other appropriate NL means (such as high-pressure water hoses). When using RCAs, plans must be flexible enough to accommodate changes in the situation and weather because it impacts the effectiveness of some agents. Planners must also consider the—

·         Location of the disturbance.

·         Estimated number of rioters.

·         Accessibility of weapons, tools, or cleaning supplies.

·         Inmate's military training.

·         Hostage situation.

7-12. Based on an analysis of these factors, the commander makes an estimate of the situation. The estimate must be as thorough as time permits. Using the estimate, the commander considers COAs, selects RCAs, and determines the need for engineer support. In choosing a COA, consider the—

·         Number of hostages.

·         Number of inmates holding the hostages.

·         Leader.

·         Attitude and demeanor of the rioters.

·         Location of the riot.

§         Inside areas of the confinement facility, such as the dining facility, work site, or housing wing.

§         Outside areas of the confinement facility, such as in exercise or work areas.

·         Accessibility of weapons or material to make weapons.

·         Accessibility of chemicals, such as cleaning supplies, cooking oils, and shoe polish.

Use of Chemical Irritants

7-13. The use of chemical irritants can be a valuable NL tool for control force leadership to consider during the planning phase. These chemical irritants can drive a threat from an established, enclosed position or deny the rioters access to a certain area without long-lasting effects to those involved. The proper use of chemical irritants may prevent the control force from having to enter a dangerous area; however, improper use can cause injury, death, or property damage.

Use-of-Force Guidelines

7-14. The installation commander authorizes the use of chemical irritants after the control force leader determines the type and dosage. The SOP outlines the procedures for securing authorization and provides guidance to help the control force leader make his decisions. The confinement facility commandant should inform the installation commander of the situation, since the installation commander is ultimately responsible. Team members must be aware of how chemical irritants affect personnel and plan accordingly. Inmates not involved must be removed from the area and the chemical cloud's path. The fire department and emergency medical services (EMS) should be on standby during operations involving chemicals.

Pepper Irritant

7-15. The pepper irritant receives its name from varieties of the capsicum plant that is it made from. The active ingredient, Oleoresin Capsicum (OC), is extracted from the plant and micropulverized to make the irritant. It is neither a chemical nor a gas, but an all-natural organic substance. It is effective against individuals who are emotionally disturbed or under the influence of drugs or alcohol. It is effective against domestic and wild animals. OC is often used to divert the threat from making or continuing an assault. OC does not cause permanent damage. Its effects last 30 to 40 minutes after individuals are placed in fresh air.

7-16. OC can have various effects on people. Some effects are—

·         Swelling of mucous membranes and the upper respiratory system; however, it does not shut down the system.

·         Burning (intense) and discoloration (bright red) of exposed skin.

·         Dilating the capillaries.

·         Swelling of the eyelids.

·         Burning and involuntary closing of the eyes.

·         Coughing uncontrollably.

·         Gagging.

·         Gasping for air.

·         Losing strength and coordination (temporarily).

OC has some disadvantages. They are that—

·         The canister depressurizes over time if not checked regularly.

·         Inmates may gain access to OC and use it against SRT members.

·         The canister must be shaken on a regular basis.

Dissemination Of Chemical Irritants

7-17. There are six methods for disseminating chemical irritants.

Pyrotechnic Method

7-18. In the pyrotechnic method of dissemination, the chemical irritant is placed in a canister with an inert material that is ignited when the device is activated. The agent is then carried into the air on the smoke particles of the inert material.

7-19. There are some disadvantages when using a pyrotechnic device indoors. These disadvantages are that the device—

·         May cause a fire.

·         Has a very slow saturation time (40 to 45 seconds to burn completely).

·         Can be thrown back by the threat, even while burning.

Bursting Method

7-20. In the bursting method of dissemination, the irritant and an inert powder are placed in a saw-toothed canister. After a small detonation, the canister splits and expels the irritant in a cloud.

7-21. The bursting method has its advantages and disadvantages. Some advantages are that—

·         There is no risk of fire.

·         There is no risk of the canister being thrown back.

·         The contents disseminate quickly.

·         The canister is effective, easy to carry, and easy to control.

Some disadvantages are that—

·         There is a slight possibility of fragmentation when detonated.

·         The fuse head may separate from the canister.

·         Only 50 to 90 percent of the irritant may be disseminated.

·         The direction of the cloud formation depends on where the device is detonated.

Aerosol Method

7-22. In the aerosol method of dissemination, the irritant is suspended in an inert liquid that is located in the rear portion of the device. When the projectile penetrates the structure, the rear portion splits open and the irritant is disseminated in a mist. The aerosol method is most appropriate for tactical operations when chemical irritants are used before entry.

7-23. The aerosol method has its advantages and disadvantages. Some advantages are that it—

·         Is easily carried.

·         Is an excellent deployment system (uses 40-millimeter, 37-millimeter, or 12-gauge ammunition).

·         Disperses the contents quickly.

·         Is easily controlled and accurate (fin-stabilized).

NOTE: Practice firing is always necessary.

Some disadvantages are the possibility of—

·         Injury to individuals if it is fired from close range.

·         Damage to the structure if it strikes a weak portion.

Projectiles Method

7-24. Chemical-containing projectiles can be very effective when used correctly. A soldier must know which projectile to use in each unique situation.

7-25. Thirty-Seven-Millimeter Projectile. A 37-millimeter projectile can incapacitate anyone in an enclosed area of 4,500 cubic feet. It can penetrate the following:

·         A sheet of 3/4-inch-thick plywood at 25 yards.

·         An automobile windshield at 33 yards.

·         A hollow-core door at 58 yards.

7-26. Forty-Millimeter Projectile. A 40-millimeter projectile is more effective at greater ranges than a 37-millimeter projectile because of its rifled bore. It can incapacitate anyone in an enclosed area of 4,500 cubic feet. It can penetrate the following:

·         A 1-inch-thick plywood at 10 yards.

·         An automobile windshield at 55 yards.

·         A hollow-core door at 109 yards.

7-27. Twelve-Gauge Projectile. A 12-gauge projectile can be loaded into a shotgun with no modifications to the weapon. It can be fired as a single round, or it can be magazine-fed. The 12-gauge projectile can incapacitate anyone in an enclosed area of 1,000 cubic feet. The angle at which the projectile strikes the barrier can affect its penetration capability. It can penetrate the following:

·         A sheet of 3/4-inch plywood at 33 yards.

·         An automobile windshield at 33 yards.

·         A hollow-core door at 100 yards.

Fogging Method

7-28. The irritant is suspended in a fogging solution and dispersed with a fogging machine. It is not recommended for tactical operations.

7-29. The fogging method has its advantages and disadvantages. Some advantages are that it—

·         Produces enough chemical irritant to cover an enclosed area of 100,000 cubic feet in 26 seconds.

·         Disseminates quickly.

·         Provides high-volume capabilities.

·         Is effective for riot control or other crowd dispersal situations.

Some disadvantages are that it is—

·         Noisy.

·         Cumbersome.

Multipurpose Grenade Method

7-30. A multipurpose grenade can be hand-thrown or launched from a shotgun with an adapter. It has an extended shelf life of 6 years and an adjustable fuse delay of 2 to 5 seconds. The irritant is located in the cylinder portion of the device and is forced out the bottom of the grenade upon detonation.

WARNING

A multipurpose grenade deployed incorrectly could result in injury. Safety rules should be observed at all times.

Record of Events

7-31. Reporting procedures for serious incidents should be included in the plans. A record of events must be initiated to provide a basis for the preparation and submission of a formal report to higher HQ. As a minimum, include the—

·         Time the incident was reported and by whom.

·         Time the incident was reported to the facility commander.

·         Time the control force was assembled.

·         Time the control force entered the facility.

·         Weather conditions as they relate to the use of RCAs.

·         Number of cadre and inmates injured or killed, including how they were injured or killed and the medical attention given to them.

·         Time the operation was completed.

·         Time the riot control force restored order.

Training

7-32. Guard units and associated teams must train on a regular basis in the five basic riot control formations. There must be a continuous training program established, to include—

·         Interpersonal communication.

·         Self-defense.

·         Use of force.

·         Use of a riot baton.

·         Fatal areas of the body to avoid when using the riot baton.

·         First aid.

·         Emergency plans.

·         Intelligence and counterintelligence techniques.

·         The use of RCAs and the various methods of dispersing them.

·         The use of NLW.

·         The use and effects of high-pressure water.

·         Riot control formations.

Equipment

7-33. The recommended basic riot gear used by the confinement riot control force is as follows:

·         Riot baton.

·         Riot shield.

·         Helmet with face shield.

·         Groin protector.

·         Flak vest.

·         Leather gloves.

·         Shin protection.

Riot Baton

7-34. The riot baton is an invaluable weapon in crowd control situations. A riot baton in the hands of a well-trained control force member is the most appropriate weapon, except with extremely violent crowds. The riot baton is not meant to replace NL munitions, but is instead used in situations in which NL munitions are not needed. Losing a riot baton to the crowd does not present a serious threat.

7-35. Use of the riot baton is based on the commander's appraisal of the situation and his choice of force option. Control forces committed with the riot baton must have teams equipped with RCAs, NLW, and lethal coverage. If the confrontation increases in intensity, the commander has these force options available and may rapidly engage the control force.

7-36. A riot baton is a versatile offensive weapon that varies in length from 26 to 42 inches with the optimum length being 36 inches. It is made of hickory and does not shatter or break easily. Both ends of the riot baton are rounded to prevent unnecessary injury. It is approximately 1 1/4 inches in diameter. Each riot baton has a hole drilled at the grip end with a leather thong threaded through the hole. The thong helps secure the riot baton to the user's hand.

Riot Shield

7-37. The riot shield (see Figure 7-1) is an excellent piece of defensive equipment. It is used by control force personnel in the front and on the flanks of the formation.

Figure 7-1. Riot Shields

7-38. The riot shield has its advantages and disadvantages. Some advantages are that—

·         OC pepper spray or high-pressure water can be used to back the control force.

·         It provides protection from thrown objects.

·         It absorbs some of the impact of rioters hurling themselves at the control force.

The disadvantages of the riot shield are that it—

·         Severely limits the use of the riot baton.

·         May crack if hit with a heavy object.

Riot Control Formations

7-39. The five basic formations for civil disturbance operations are the line, wedge, echelon, diamond, and circle. In the correctional environment the basic formations for disturbances are the line, wedge, or echelon with apprehension teams in support. Generally, the diamond and circle formations are not used in the correctional environment. The minimum size force that the commander should consider is an augmented platoon, with a two-to-one advantage over the rioters.

7-40. Correctional facility cadre must be proficient in all riot control formations. These are usually trained at the squad level and above, but performed by a platoon or company-sized unit. Squad line, echelon left, echelon right, and wedge formations form the basis for platoon and company formations. Each squad must be adept in the basic formations before practicing in platoon-sized or larger formations. For more detailed information on formations, see STPs 19-95B1-SM and 19-95B24-SM-TG. In the correctional environment, the support platoon plays a key role by supporting the control formation with apprehension and equipment teams. See Chapter 6 for an in-depth discussion on civil disturbance formations.

Apprehension Teams

7-41. Apprehension teams give the control force the ability to extract inmates. Inmates identified as leaders or agitators and inmates that are injured or no longer want to resist can be extracted from the crowd. Apprehension teams can also be used to enter confined areas where the formation cannot operate.

7-42. The apprehension team will consist of eight members and one leader. Each team will have four shield holders, two nonlethal gunners and two apprehension/search members. The squad leader controls the movement of the team and assists the team in exiting the control formation. He maintains communications with the formation and coordinates the team's operations with the formation. The squad leader also ensures that the team uses the minimum amount of force necessary to extract inmates.

7-43. The apprehension team may deploy through the middle of the formation or from around either of the flanks.

7-44. The apprehension team should be deployed within a distance of approximately 10 meters so that the formation can still provide immediate support. If the apprehension team is deployed farther than 10 meters, the formation must advance to close the gap.

7-45. The team will exit the formation in two columns; shield holders in the first and second ranks, nonlethal gunners in the third rank, apprehension/search members in the fourth rank and the leader last. Team members grip the shoulder or equipment of the member in front of them. The shield holders will envelop the inmate that is to be extracted and form a protective barrier. Once the shield holders have enveloped the inmate, the nonlethal gunners will cover their sides with their weapons while the apprehension/search members control and restrain the inmate. When the team has the inmate under control, the squad leader will give the order for the team to withdraw. The team withdraws in reverse order (apprehension/search members with the inmate, followed by nonlethal gunners and shield holders). Team members then move backwards, face the crowd and grip the shoulder or equipment of the member in front of them.

Team Equipment

7-46. The apprehension team uses the following equipment:

·         Flex-Cufs.

·         Restraint cutters.

·         Pepper spray.

·         Helmets with face shields.

·         Groin protectors.

·         Flak vests.

·         Elbow pads.

·         Leather gloves.

·         Shin protectors.

·         Knee pads.

·         A video camera.

Team Composition

7-47. The apprehension team is composed of five team members. This team consists of four members and a squad leader. Team member one is the team leader.

Squad Leader

7-48. The squad leader assists the team in exiting the control formation and ensures that the team uses the minimum force necessary to subdue inmates. He is also responsible for signaling the PSG if more help is needed.

Team Member One (Team Leader)

7-49. Team member one's responsibility is to make initial contact with the inmate and use pepper spray and apply Flex-Cufs, as needed. He also carries a set of restraint cutters. Once the apprehension team has returned to the relative safety of the control formation, team member one searches the inmate.

7-50. Team member one receives the command to move forward and secure the inmate from the squad leader. This command is usually given by a signal and verbal command. Team member one then notifies the main force commander where his team exits the control force. Once the team is in position to exit the main formation, team member one signals the member of the formation in front of him. This is usually a prearranged signal, such as a tap on the right shoulder. The control force opens and the team exits the formation and makes contact with the assigned inmate. Team members then subdue and control the inmate. If pepper spray is needed, team member five shouts, "Pepper." This gives the other team members time to react to the command and spray the inmate. Team member one then applies Flex-Cufs to the inmate's wrists and ankles. Depending on the mission, the inmate may be left for follow-on security forces or carried behind the control force to be secured by security forces.

7-51. Should the mission require that the inmate be moved, team member one shouts, "Prepare to Move," this allows each member to grab an arm and position the inmate toward the control force formation. When the team is ready to move, team member two shouts, "Ready," alerting team member one that the team is ready for the last command. Team member one then commands, "Move." The team enters the control formation with the inmate. The inmate is searched by team member one and turned over to the security team.

Team Member Two

7-52. Team member two stands directly behind team member five with his hands on team member five's waist. He protects the left side of team member five by moving to team member five's left and helps to secure the inmate after team member one makes initial contact. He repeats team member five's commands and controls the inmate's head after the inmate is on the ground.

Team Member Three

7-53. Team member three stands behind team member two with his hands on team member two's waist. He protects the right side of team member five by moving to team member five's right and helps to secure the inmate after initial contact.

Team Member Four

7-54. Team member four stands behind team member three with his hands on team member three's waist. His task is to help subdue the inmate in any way possible. He usually concentrates on the inmate's body below the knees. He acts as the eyes and ears for the team during control of the inmate.

Team Member Five

7-55. Team member five gives commands to control the inmate.

Forced Cell Move Teams

7-56. The intent of a forced cell move is to move an unruly and/or uncooperative inmate from one cell to another. This is a difficult task and must not be taken lightly. A forced cell move must be thoroughly planned, rehearsed, and resourced to ensure the safety of the team members and the inmate.

7-57. A number of reasons may compel the commander to consider a forced cell move. The inmate may refuse to eat, take medication, accept medical attention, get a haircut, keep himself clean, work, or move or rotate cells when ordered to. These are some of the reasons that the commander may order a forced cell move.

Team Composition and Equipment

7-58. The FCMT is composed of six corrections cadre and two support cadre from military police and medical sections specially trained in forced cell movement. Primarily, the team consists of the following personnel:

·         One officer in charge (OIC) (E7 or above).

·         Five corrections cadre.

·         One military police investigator.

·         One medic.

7-59. The FCMT uses the following standard equipment:

·         Helmets with face shields.

·         Groin protectors.

·         Flak vests.

·         Elbow pads.

·         Leather gloves.

·         Shin protectors.

·         Knee pads.

·         A pinning shield.

·         Restraints (hand or leg irons or Flex-Cufs).

·         A video camera.

Actions Prior to Team Employment

7-60. The OIC gives an operations order (OPORD) to team member five (the team leader) of the FCMT. As a minimum, the OPORD should answer the following questions about the incident leading up to the move:

·         Did the inmate fail to comply with orders?

·         Did the inmate assault cadre or other inmates?

·         Is the objective of the move to force a shower or haircut?

·         Is OC pepper spray authorized for use?

·         Has the inmate been moved before?

·         What is the condition of the area where the inmate is currently located?

·         Has the inmate tested positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)?

·         Does the inmate have a weapon or the materials needed to make one?

·         Is the area barricaded?

·         Has he smeared himself with body fluids or other slippery substances?

·         Can you approach the inmate without risk to him and/or others?

7-61. The team is assembled for inspection by the OIC, and the team members are required to brief the OIC on their individual duties and responsibilities. A line formation is the customary formation for this inspection. It should take place out of site of the inmates.

7-62. Each soldier takes one step forward and briefs the OIC as shown in the following example: "I am (rank and name), team member one. My mission is to pin the inmate using the minimum amount of force necessary. I carry the pinning shield." He then faces so the camera can record the number printed on the back of his flak jacket and holds up the pinning shield [see Figure 7-2]).

Figure 7-2. Recording Team Members' Duty Position

Individual Team Member Responsibilities

7-63. Each individual team member has his own responsibilities during a forced cell move. Each team member must do his designated job while working as a team.

Team Member One

7-64. Team member one is the eyes and ears of the team. His responsibility is to carry the pinning shield up to the cell door and describe the scene with as much detail as possible (especially including anything that may cause harm to the team). The pinning shield is used to protect the team from body fluids thrown at the them by the inmate.

7-65. Team member one describes the scene in the cell to his teammates by turning his head to the right and speaking in a loud voice so that all team members can hear him. A slap on the right shoulder by team member two alerts him that all team members have heard him. If he receives a slap on the left shoulder from team member two, he repeats the situation report (SITREP) in a loud, clear voice. The decision to enter the inmate's area with or without the pinning shield is team member one's decision, unless the inmate is known to have a weapon. Should he decide to enter without the pinning shield, team member one then enters with both hands held approximately chest high. When team member one is unable to determine if the inmate has a weapon, the pinning shield is used. Charging through the open cell door, team member one drives the inmate to the bunk or ground with the shield. Once pinned, team member one secures the inmate's head and ensures that it is not twisted or turned in relation to its natural form. He may have to use the various pressure points on the inmate's head to help subdue him.

Team Member Two

7-66. Team member two steps forward and briefs the OIC as follows: "I am (rank and name), team member two. My mission is to secure the inmate's right arm using the minimum amount of force necessary. I carry one set of hand irons." He then holds the hand irons up for video camera taping (see Figure 7-3) and says, "I also carry one canister of OC pepper spray to be used at the direction of the team OIC." He then holds up the canister for video camera taping and faces so the camera can record the number on the back of his flak jacket (see Figure 7-3).

Figure 7-3. Recording Team Members' Equipment

7-67. Team member two lines up directly behind team member one. He keeps contact with team member one until he can secure the inmate's strong arm. Team member two taps team member one on his right or left shoulder after being tapped by team member three. Once inside the cell, team member two secures the prisoners strong hand with wrist restraints and announces, "Hands secure," to team member five.

Team Member Three

7-68. Team member three steps forward and briefs the OIC as follows: "I am (rank and name), team member three. My mission is to secure the inmate's left arm using the minimum amount of force necessary." He then faces so the camera can record the number on the back of his flak jacket (see Figure 7-4). Team member three lines up directly behind team member two. Team member three keeps contact with team member two until he can grasp a portion of the inmate's body. He then concentrates on securing the inmate's weak hand and assisting team member two in applying hand restraints. Team member three taps team member two on his right or left shoulder after being tapped by team member four.

Figure 7-4. Recording Number on Flak Jacket

Team Member Four

7-69. Team member four steps forward and briefs the OIC as follows: "I am (rank and name), team member four. My mission is to secure the inmate's right leg using the minimum amount of force necessary. I carry one set of leg irons." He holds the leg irons up for the camera to record (see Figure 7-2, page 7-13). He then faces so the camera can record the number on the back of his flak jacket (see Figure 7-2). Team member four lines up directly behind team member three. He taps team member three on his right or left shoulder after being tapped by team member five. Team member four keeps contact with team member three until he can secure a portion of the inmate's body. Team member four concentrates on securing the right leg of the inmate. It is his responsibility to apply the leg irons. Once the legs are secure, he announces, "Legs secure," to team member five.

Team Member Five (Team Leader)

7-70. Team member five steps forward and briefs the OIC as follows: "I am (rank and name), team member five. My mission is to secure the inmate's left leg using the minimum amount of force necessary. I carry a restraint key (hold up for the camera to view). I am also the team leader for this mission and it is my responsibility to ensure that the team uses the minimum amount of force necessary to subdue the inmate." He then faces so the camera can record the number on the back of his flak jacket (see Figure 7-4).

7-71. Team member five taps team member four on the right shoulder when he has heard the SITREP from team member one. If he does not hear the report or needs to hear it again, he taps team member four on the left shoulder. Team member five keeps in contact with team member four until he can secure a portion of the inmate's body. He secures the left leg and assists team member four in applying the leg irons. Once he has heard that the hands and legs are secure, team member five signals for the team to conduct an equipment check. The team members check the equipment in place.

NOTE: At no time is the inmate to be released by anyone.

Medic

7-72. The medic briefs the OIC in the following manner: "I am (rank and name), the medic. My mission is to treat all injuries that may occur during the move." He follows the instructions given to him by the OIC/NCOIC. His mission is to observe the inmate for signs of injury before the forced cell move and assess the inmate's condition during and after the move.

Military Police Investigator

7-73. The military police investigator (MPI) is responsible for videotaping the entire forced cell move. This includes the OIC/NCOIC briefing the OPORD, each team member briefing his responsibilities to the OIC, and any medical treatment rendered to the inmate.

Actions During the Forced Cell Move

7-74. There are many actions performed during a forced cell move. Each member of the FCMT must complete his task successfully to accomplish the forced cell move.

Officer in Charge or Noncommissioned Officer in Charge

7-75. The OIC, an E7 or above, is responsible for ensuring that the team uses the minimum amount of force necessary to subdue the inmate. He is also responsible for ensuring that all necessary precautions have been taken to ensure the safety of the team and the inmate. The OIC gives the inmate the initial orders to comply and informs him of the consequences of noncompliance. He does this by placing himself at the front of the inmate's cell (see Figure 7-5). The orders are not given until it can be enforced by the FCMT. The following prepared statement is read to the inmate by the OIC:

"I am (rank and name), OIC of this FCMT. At this time I am ordering you to lie face down on your bunk (or other designated location) with your head to the rear of the cell. Cross your hands behind your back and cross your feet as the team enters the cell and uses the minimum amount of force necessary to place you in restraints and move you to (give location). Failure on your part to comply with these instructions or to resist the FCMT will result in the use of force (OC pepper spray if applicable). Do you understand these instructions? If so, lie down on the bunk."

Figure 7-5. OIC Reading Compliance Statement to Inmate

7-76. After reading the instructions to the inmate, the OIC faces the camera and states whether the inmate complied. He then waits 60 seconds and motions for the team to position itself in front of the inmate's cell (see Figure 7-6). The OIC directs the opening of the cell when the team is positioned at the entrance to the cell and prepared to enter. He positions himself so he can observe team entry to and departure from the cell. If OC spray is authorized, the OIC tells the team when to spray the inmate with OC spray. This task is done in silence. Communication between team members should be done through hand-and-arm signals, unless noted otherwise.

 

Figure 7-6. OIC and FCMT

Team Member One

7-77. Once the team is positioned in front of the inmate's cell, team member one starts his report. At a minimum, he must answer the following questions and report them to the team:

·         Does the inmate have a weapon, if so, what kind?

·         Does the inmate appear dry?

·         Is the inmate clothed or wearing extra clothing?

·         Has the inmate smeared anything on his body?

·         Can you see the inmate's hands?

·         Is the cell barricaded or visibly booby-trapped?

·         Is the cell dry?

·         Are cell furnishings intact?

7-78. Based on the answers to the above questions, team member one must decide whether to enter the cell with or without the shield (see Figure 7-7). Team member one's ultimate goal is to pin the inmate on the bunk or floor.

Figure 7-7. FCMT Preparing to Enter a Cell

Team Member Two

7-79. Team member two keeps contact with team member one until he can secure the inmate's strong arm. If he cannot immediately secure the inmate's arm, he secures a portion of the inmate's body and progresses to the inmate's strong arm. Once the inmate's hands are secure, he announces, "Hands secure," to team member five (see Figure 7-8).

Team Member Three

7-80. Team member three keeps contact with team member two until he can grasp a portion of the inmate's body. Team member three concentrates on securing the inmate's weak hand and assists team member two in applying Flex-Cufs. Team member three maintains control of the inmate's hands and looks at team member five for further instructions (see Figure 7-8).

Team Member Four

7-81. Team member four keeps contact with team member three until he can secure a portion of the inmate's body. Team member four concentrates on securing the inmate's right leg. He applies leg irons and when the inmate's legs are secure, he announces, "Legs secure," (see Figure 7-8).

Team Member Five (Team Leader)

7-82. Team member five keeps contact with team member four until he secures a portion of the inmate's body. Team member five concentrates on securing the inmate's left leg and assists with the application of leg irons. When he is informed that the hands and legs are secure, the team searches the inmate for weapons and contraband. Once the search is complete, team member five commands, "Prepare to Lift."

Figure 7-8. FCMT Securing an Inmate

Movement of the Inmate

7-83. Team member one positions his hands to control the inmate's head during the move, turning the inmate's head toward the wall. Team members two and three position themselves on the inmate's right and left sides. They grasp the wrist or forearm of the team member opposite them to form a platform for the inmate to lie on. Team member four positions himself on the inmate's right side even with the inmate's knees. This places him in position to control the inmate's legs. Team member five's position is on the inmate's left side and enables him to control the inmate's lower legs and feet. When in position, team member five ensures that all team members are in place before commanding, "Ready, Lift."

7-84. On the command "Lift," all team members simultaneously stand with the inmate. They should sandwich the inmate between them to facilitate control. Team member five then commands, "Prepare to Turn, Ready—Turn." The inmate is always turned toward the bunk. If a bunk is not available, team member five should specify which direction to turn the inmate. The inmate is then removed from the cell (see Figure 7-9).

Figure 7-9. Moving the Inmate

7-85. Once the inmate is on the tier, team member five commands, "Prepare to Lower, Team—Lower." The team simultaneously lowers the inmate to the floor with the team keeping positive control of the inmate. The medic asks the inmate, "Do you have any injuries at this time?" (see Figure 7-10). If the inmate has no injuries, the medic looks at the camera and states, "Inmate (inmate name) appears to have sustained no injuries." If the inmate has sustained injuries, the medic treats those injuries and completes a sworn statement. If OC was employed, the medic decontaminates the inmate using water and paper towels. The medic instructs the inmate to tilt his head to the side and flush his eyes with water for approximately 5 minutes. The medic then dries the inmate's face.

Figure 7-10. Treating Injuries

Placement of the Inmate in a Cell

7-86. Team member five orders an equipment check before returning the inmate to a cell. He then commands, "Prepare to Lift, Team—Lift." Team members position themselves exactly where they were when they removed the inmate from the cell. Next, team members simultaneously lift the inmate and return him to the predetermined cell. They move the inmate into the cell head first with his face toward the bunk. Once inside the cell, team member five commands the team to lower the inmate onto the bunk (see Figure 7-11). Team members then remove the inmate's restraints, keeping positive control of the inmate at all times. Team members use a nonverbal signal to notify team member five when the restraints are removed. He signals another equipment check. Team members then account for all equipment in place and prepare to exit the cell. The team exits the cell in the same manner as they entered, but in reverse order.

Figure 7-11. Placing Inmate in Cell

7-87. Team member four moves into position where he can control both of the inmate's legs while team member five moves toward the cell door. When team member four is ready to exit the cell, team member three moves to control the inmate's legs, team member two moves to where he can control both of the inmates arms, and team member one maintains control of the inmate's head. Team member four maintains contact with team member three at all times. When team member three is ready to exit the cell, team member two moves into a position where he can control the inmate's lower body and team member one moves into position to control the inmate's upper body. Using a prearranged, nonverbal signal, the team pulls team members one and two from the cell. The FCMT is prepared to reenter the cell if the inmate attempts to attack team members one and two as they exit the cell. The FCMT remains ready to re-enter until the cell door is secured.

 

End