[FrontPage Include Component]

 

I am aware of the supreme value of trade apprenticeship programs and the simple fact that Free-Ed.Net cannot provide that. However, there is always room for apprentices (and proven professionals) to review and expand their understanding of current welding methods, tools, and regulations. That's where Free-Ed.Net can be a continuous, lifelong resource for you.

 


Welding is the most common way of permanently joining metal parts. In this process, heat is applied to metal pieces, melting and fusing them to form a permanent bond. Because of its strength, welding is used in shipbuilding, automobile manufacturing and repair, aerospace applications, and thousands of other manufacturing activities. Welding also is used to join steel beams in the construction of buildings, bridges, and other structures and to join pipes in pipelines, powerplants, and refineries.

Welders work in a wide variety of industries, from car racing to manufacturing. The work that welders do and the equipment they use vary with the industry. Arc welding, the most common type of welding today, uses electrical currents to create heat and bond metals together—but there are more than a hundred different processes that a welder can use. The type of weld normally is determined by the types of metals being joined and the conditions under which the welding is to take place.

Cutters use heat to cut and trim metal objects to specific dimensions. The work of arc, plasma, and oxy–gas cutters is closely related to that of welders. However, instead of joining metals, cutters use the heat from an electric arc, a stream of ionized gas called plasma, or burning gases to cut and trim metal objects to specific dimensions. Cutters also dismantle large objects, such as ships, railroad cars, automobiles, buildings, and aircraft. Some operate and monitor cutting machines similar to those used by welding machine operators.

Fact: Underwater welding and cutting is one of the ten most dangerous jobs today.


Courses


Note: Some of these tutorials might require a PDF reader. If you do not have an the Adobe Acrobat Reader installed on your device, you can download a free copy here. Many also require the Google Play app for mobile devices.


Your Proof of
Participation



Cabinetry and Joinery

Concrete and Masonry

Electrical Construction

Plumbing

Painting

HVAC and Refrigeration

 

David L. Heiserman, Editor

Copyright ©  SweetHaven Publishing Services
All Rights Reserved

Revised: June 06, 2015